Sunday, September 30, 2007

It's Dennis, not Charlie!

I was just taking a look at the statistics for my website. I was viewing the search phrases people used this month to find my pages. I see that on a day in September someone was looking for "Charlie Brown playground, Monterey CA"

Close. Very close. I assume they found the correct name once they got here.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Barry Bonds

I'm not a sports fan, but I do enjoy watching a game of Giants Baseball. I haven't followed Barry Bonds' career like some have, but I have become a fan. I haven't followed the controversy surrounding him all that much. After all, every successful person seems to be controversial in some way.

But something doesn't seem right. As far as my limited understanding could tell, he is still a productive player. He stated his desire to remain a Giant. He drew crowds to the ballpark in what was otherwise a miserable season.

For this he got fired.

I don't get it.

What really galled me was seeing all of the warm fuzzy tributes in tonight's game, Barry's last at home. We watched Giants owner Peter Magowan shed crocodile tears as he watched the "Thank You Barry" scoreboard video at the end of the game. Somehow the thanks seemed as insincere as the tears. You don't fire a guy you appreciate.

They say that's just business, that is was time for Barry to move on. But it wasn't Barry Bonds who drove the Giants into last place. Nobody who was responsible for this year's poor showing got fired. No, the Giants seem to do things a little differently. Former Manager Dusty Baker took the Giants to the World Series a few years ago.

For this he got fired.

I see a pattern here.

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Spray Day!

I know, I've been AWOL again. Too many weird things going on in my life these days to keep up with a journal on a regular basis. I don't think I have any regular readers, anyway, so its probably no big deal.

But I did find a topic important enough
to get me writing a bit. Its that blasted light brown apple moth, also known as LBAM.

For those of you who aren't in the know, let me explain. According to California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA, another acronym!), LBAM is an invasive pest that is going to eat every tree, bush, and head of lettuce in Monterey County if it isn't stopped. OK, I'm exaggerating. They say the damages could potentially be in the millions of dollars, but I'm not convinced they're not exaggerating, either. Maybe, maybe not.

In an attempt to eradicate the moth,
the California Department of Food and Agriculture decided to spray Marina, Seaside, Monterey, Pacific Grove and most of Pebble Beach with a pheromone. A pheromone is basically a naturally occurring aphrodisiac, secreted by female moths, that makes the male moths horny. By applying it everywhere, the male moths won't be able to tell the difference between a female LBAM and a leaf or a blade of grass, so it will most likely screw the leaf instead of the girl moth and prevent any baby LBAMs from being born. This, they say, will bring an end to the species in the region without resorting to toxic chemicals and without actually killing anything.

I gotta say that this is a whole lot better than getting sprayed with a pesticide called Sevin mixed with diesel oil. That's what my neighborhood got hit with when I lived in Oregon a quarter century ago. It was gypsy moths they were afraid of then.

But that's not to say I have faith in the government to do us no harm. Maybe its things like DDT, MTBE, a collapsing bridge, Iraq, and similar such things that make me suspicious any time the government says "trust us." I remember Ronald Reagan's words "Trust but verify." (Actually I recall that Reagan was actually quoting Gorbachev, but since Gorbachev didn't speak English, Reagan was merely passing the concept along. But that's not important right now.)

So CDFA people came to town before the spraying to answer people's questions. Except they couldn't answer them. I called the 800 number myself to ask if the product, called CheckMate, had ever been sprayed on people before. Nobody could answer my question! I later learned it had never been sprayed on an urban area, nor had it ever been tested on  humans because the FDA prohibits testing on humans. Apparently FDA allows spraying on humans, as long as it isn't a test.

I'm not too concerned about the pheromone itself, but the manufacturer says the pheromone is "microencapsulated" in, well, they won't tell us in what because its a trade secret. It seems to me that if you're going to spray a product over the heads of 100,000 people we ought to know what is in it. I assume the stuff is patented, so its not as if someone else can just steal the idea. There outta be a law which says that a company can't hide behind "proprietary information" when public health and safety is an issue.

Apparently, the product (which is diluted with plain water) is sprayed in such a fine mist that it doesn't even leave any apparent moisture on the ground. I know, I watched the  plane go over our house half a dozen times on the night of September 10th and nothing appeared on the ground,  or on our car windshields. If its that fine, then most likely it was inhaled by a lot of folks (many of whom were walking down the street oblivious to the plane overhead) before the stuff hit the ground.

It may very well be that the stuff is completely harmless. But please, don't ask 100,000 people to accept that on faith alone. Just tell us what the ingredients are so that independent scientists and health officials and laymen alike can assess the hazard and decide if it is appropriate. And please, do it before the next spray day, which is scheduled for sometime in mid October.